Ergonomics for Working Remotely

By: Environmental Health & Safety on

Working remotely during this pandemic brings significant challenges. Finding a correct ergonomic
set-up at home to do computer work for 8 hours (or more) per day is a challenge, but critically
important. Although taking the laptop to your bed or couch may be tempting, you should avoid
it as it will likely result in awkward postures that will affect your body and productivity. Instead,
we suggest the following:

  1. The feet should be firmly supported on the
    floor or on a footrest. If needed, you can use
    old binders or books as foot rest.
  2. Maintain the knee angle at approximately
    90-115 degrees. Also, make sure that there is at
    least 1-2 inches of clearance between the back
    of your knee and the front edge of the seat.
  3. Comfortable hip angle is between 90 and
    120 degrees.
  4. Make sure your lower back is resting on the
    chair. If you need more back support, use
    cushions or roll a small towel to place in your
    lower back area.
  5. Sit back against the chair to get appropriate
    upper body support.
  6. Keep upper arms as close as possible and inline with torso. Avoid reaching for the keyboard
    or mouse to minimize shoulder and neck stress.
  7. Set the height of the keyboard and mouse to
    achieve an elbow angle of between 90-100
    degrees. Armrests should be adjusted to provide gentle and occasional support. You should
    not be hunching your shoulders or leaning heavily on the armrests.
  8. If available, use a separate keyboard and mouse with your laptop so you can adjust your
    screen to be at the right height. Set up the keyboard and mouse at about elbow height or
    slightly lower, so your wrists are as straight as possible when you place your hands on the
    keyboard.
  9. Set the top of visible screen at eye height to optimize neck posture. Adjust up or down as
    needed if you wear progressive lenses. Keep the head balanced over the shoulders.
  10. Set the distance of the monitor to approximately 20-40 inches from you or at arm’s-length
    to avoid leaning forward into the monitor.
  11. If you have one, use a document holder for data entry tasks.
  • Move your screen, turn off lights, or close window blinds if needed to avoid glare.
  • Take breaks regularly to move around and to look at objects other than a screen.

Contact Noel Crespo (Noel.Crespo@ucf.edu) or Jose Vazquez (Jose.Vazquez@ucf.edu) if you
have any questions, or would like additional information.

Share This Article

Featured Content image

Can a Mask Protect Me? Putting Homemade Masks in the Hierarchy of Controls

https://www.jhsph.edu/research/centers-and-institutes/johns-hopkins-education-and-research-center-for-occupational-safety-and-health/can-a-mask-protect-me-putting-homemade-masks-in-the-hierarchy-of-controls

Read More

Featured Content image

COVID-19 UCF Building Sanitization Requests

UCF Building Sanitization Request Form

Read More

Featured Content image

Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) Information

Please see the following links for information regarding the Novel Coronavirus. https://www.ucf.edu/news/coronavirus-awareness-and-guidance/ https://www.ucf.edu/safety/coronavirus/ https://studenthealth.ucf.edu/coronavirus/ https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/  

Read More

Featured Content image

Building Code Office has Moved

Please be advised that The Building Code Office has moved to the Office of the Vice President for Administration and Finance. Click HERE to access their new site. Please contact Ning Li or Stephanie Coleman with...

Read More